Volunteer Spotlight: Go-Getter

When her best friend asked her to co-lead a troop, she couldn’t say no.

At Girl Scouts, we know our volunteers are the backbone of our organization, devoting countless hours to bringing out the G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader) in every girl. From cookie season to community service projects and everything in between—our volunteers are committed and passionate. We know the work isn’t easy, but it means so much to our 40,000 girls who are learning crucial skills, experiencing new activities, and making lifelong friends. Not only that, they’re also developing confidence and learning what it takes to lead with empathy. And it’s all thanks to our volunteers, who are showing our girls that yes—they are the future!

Here at GSGLA, we have more than 24,000 volunteers who contribute their time, talents, and energy to empowering our girls.  Throughout April (National Volunteer Month), we will be highlighting some of them right here on our blog.


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Gini hard at work at the Cadette overnight.

We begin our series with go-getter and long-time volunteer Gini Vandergon, who co-leads Senior Girl Scout Troop 3025. (She’s also receiving the Appreciation Pin at our Volunteer Recognition Ceremony on April 22.)

Gini started her Girl Scouting career in the second grade—and loved being a part of a troop so much, she stayed in Girl Scouts for 10 years. “Girl Scouts gave me opportunities that otherwise I wouldn’t have had,” says Gini, who grew up in the Bay Area. Even when she moved before seventh grade, she joined a new troop to continue her Girl Scouting experience and meet girls with similar interests—especially outdoors activities, like camping and canoeing. She even went to Hawaii with her sister Girl Scouts during her senior year of high school, using troop funds.

So when her best friend asked her to co-lead her daughter’s Daisy troop, Gini couldn’t say no. That was a decade ago. Today, the girls are Seniors and two of them have earned the Girl Scout Gold Award (the highest achievement in Girl Scouting), with one of them working toward it. According to Gini, leading a troop is “really rewarding, and if you can volunteer with the same group of girls, it’s really fun to see how they grow and mature.”

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As a role model, Gini has used her influence to introduce the girls to new experiences and broaden their horizons. Growing up by the beach, some of the girls hadn’t ever seen snow—until Gini and her co-leader took them to Frazier Park. She’s also encouraged them to help underserved communities, leading to many service projects over the years, as well as the girls’ pursuit of the Gold Award.

Gini herself is a biology professor and advocates for STEM education, particularly for girls and women. She believes Girl Scouts opens doors for girls and gives them leadership skills—much like it did for her: “I was very shy when I was young, and Girl Scouts helped me overcome that and gain confidence.”

Being a troop leader has also brought her into contact with like-minded women who want to empower and inspire girls. She says one of the draws of volunteering has not only been working with her co-leader (and best friend), but also “[the] wonderful women involved in Girl Scouting we’ve met over the years, who are great role models for girls.”

Gini looks forward to staying involved with Girl Scouts after her girls graduate in a couple years. Her advice for other leaders, particularly those of younger troops: “It gets easier. You don’t have to do everything—take it in pieces. Soon the girls begin to come up with their own ideas, and can take the lead on their own.”


Thank you, Gini, for your hard work and commitment to uplifting girls, and for providing the GSGLA community with your insight. We look forward to honoring you at our Volunteer Recognition Ceremony on April 22—Girl Scout Leader’s Day.

Stay tuned for the next profile in our National Volunteer Month blog series. For more information on volunteering for Girl Scouts, click here.

Author: Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles

Building girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.

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